internationalising the curriculum: assessing faculty, departments, and schools on their efforts

Abstract

In 2005 the American Council on Education asked the American Political Science Association (APSA) to work towards internationalising undergraduate education. Since almost a decade has passed since these initial efforts, it is crucial to examine how far the discipline has come in internationalising the curriculum. This article will discuss and evaluate how to assess and understand what faculty, departments, and schools have done in pursuing the internationalisation of the undergraduate curriculum through the use of an online survey. It will examine the process of creating the survey instrument and the issues around doing so. The results of the survey, while not the focus here, will inform this discussion in the article. Competing definitions of internationalisation, differences in conceptualisation from American and other, mostly European, perspectives, and questions about how to internationalise at the course, department, or programme level were issues that the survey revealed needed more discussion. Moreover, the article seeks to discuss how to move forward in the assessment of internationalisation efforts.

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Appendix

Appendix

INTERNATIONALISING THE CURRICULUM SURVEY

Q1 Intro

Q2 What type of institution do you teach at?

  • Community College (1)

  • Baccalaureate College (2)

  • Master’s University (3)

  • Doctoral University (4) Q3 Is your college/university public or private?

  • Public (1)

  • Private (2) Q4 What is the size of your overall student population?

  • Less than 5,000 students (1)

  • 5,000 to 10,000 students (2)

  • 10,000 to 15,000 students (3)

  • 15,000 to 20,000 students (4)

  • More than 20,000 students (5) Q5 How many of your students are from out of the state?

  • 0–10 per cent (1)

  • 11–20 per cent (2)

  • 21–30 per cent (3)

  • 31–40 per cent (4)

  • 41–50 per cent (5)

  • More than 50 per cent (6) Q6 How many of your students are from out of the country?

  • 0–5 per cent (1)

  • 6–10 per cent (2)

  • 11–15 per cent (3)

  • 16–20 per cent (4)

  • 21–25 per cent (5)

  • More than 25 per cent (6) Q7 Does your college/university require a common core or general education programme?

  • Yes (1)

  • No (2) ANSWER IF Q7 Does your college/university require a common core or gen … Yes is Selected Q8 What course/courses are required?

  • Open response ANSWER IF Q7 Does your college/university require a common core or gen … Yes is Selected Q9 Is there a common textbook or set of readings?

  • Yes (1)

  • No (2) ANSWER IF Q9 Is there a common textbook or set of readings? Yes is Selected Q10 Which textbook or readings?

  • Open response ANSWER IF Q7 Does your college/university require a common core or gen … Yes is Selected Q11 For each course that is required, does the course include non-US scholarship in the course?

  • Yes (1)

  • No (2) ANSWER IF Q7 Does your college/university require a common core or gen … Yes is Selected Q13 Would you define the college/university’s common core as sufficiently internationalised?

  • Yes (1)

  • No (2) ANSWER IF Q13 Would you define the college/university’s common core as … Yes is Selected Or Would you define the college/university’s common core as … No is Selected Q16 Why?

  • Open response Q14 Does your college or university have efforts underway to globalise or internationalise its students?

  • Yes (1)

  • No (2)

  • Open response ANSWER IF Q14 Does your college or university have efforts underway to … Yes is Selected Q18 Please provide a brief description of these efforts. Q15 Does your department require a common core?

  • Yes (1)

  • No (2) ANSWER IF Q15 Does your department require a common core? Yes is Selected Q19 What course/courses are required?

  • Open response Q20 Is there a common book?

  • Yes (1)

  • No (2) ANSWER IF Q20 Is there a common book? Yes is Selected Q21 Which book? ANSWER IF Q19 Does your department require a common core? Yes is Selected

  • Open response Q22 For required courses, does the course include non-US scholarship in the curriculum?

  • Yes, in all required courses (1)

  • Yes, in at least half of the required courses (2)

  • Yes, in less than half the required courses (3)

  • No (4) ANSWER IF Q15 Does your department require a common core? Yes is Selected Q23 Would you define the departments’ core as sufficiently internationalised?

  • Yes (1)

  • No (2) ANSWER IF Q23 Would you define the departments’ core as sufficiently in … Yes is Selected Or Would you define the departments’ core as sufficiently in … No is Selected Q24 Why?

  • Open response Q25 Does your department have efforts underway to globalise or internationalise students?

  • Yes (1)

  • No (2) ANSWER IF Q25 Does your department have efforts underway to globalise o … Yes is Selected Q26 Please provide a brief description of these efforts.

  • Open response Q27 Which subfields do you specialise in?

  • American Politics (1)

  • International Relations (2)

  • Pubic Politics (3)

  • Comparative Politics (4)

  • Public Law (5) Q28 What are your areas of research?

  • Open response Q29 Do you use non-US scholarship in your research?

  • Yes (1)

  • No (2) ANSWER IF Q29 Do you use non-US scholarship in your research? Yes is Selected Q30 How much?

  • 0–10 per cent (1)

  • 11–20 per cent (2)

  • 21–30 per cent (3)

  • 31–40 per cent (4)

  • 41–50 per cent (5)

  • More than 50 per cent (6) Q31 What courses do you teach?

  • Open response Q32 Do you use a textbook?

  • Yes (1)

  • No (2) ANSWER IF Q32 Do you use a textbook? Yes is Selected Q33 Which textbook?

  • Open response Q34 Do you include non-US scholarship as part of your course?

  • Yes (1)

  • No (2) ANSWER IF Q34 Do you include non-US scholarship as part of your course? Yes is Selected Q35 Please provide one or two examples of the non-US scholarship you use.

  • Open response Q36 Would you consider your course as internationalised?

  • Yes (1)

  • No (2) Q37 Please provide a brief explanation of your answer.

  • Open response Q38 How do you define internationalising the curriculum?

  • Open response Q39 What elements do you think are necessary for a curriculum to be considered sufficiently internationalised?

  • Open response Q40 What elements do you think are sufficient for a curriculum to be considered internationalised?

  • Open response Q41 How does your department define internationalising the curriculum?

  • Open response Q42 How does your university define internationalising the curriculum?

  • Open response Q43 American Politics should continue to be taught as its own subfield.

  • Strongly agree (1)

  • Agree (2)

  • Neither agree nor disagree (3)

  • Disagree (4)

  • Strongly disagree (5) Q44 American Politics should be taught as part of the Comparative Politics subfield.

  • Strongly agree (1)

  • Agree (2)

  • Neither agree nor disagree (3)

  • Disagree (4)

  • Strongly disagree (5) Q45 Non-US readings should be included in American Politics courses.

  • Strongly agree (1)

  • Agree (2)

  • Neither agree nor disagree (3)

  • Disagree (4)

  • Strongly disagree (5) Q46 How much of an introductory course in Political Theory should be devoted to non-Western sources?

  • 0–10 per cent (1)

  • 11–20 per cent (2)

  • 21–30 per cent (3)

  • 31–40 per cent (4)

  • 41–50 per cent (5)

  • More than 50 per cent (6) Q47 How much of an advanced Political Theory course should be devoted to non-Western sources?

  • 0–10 per cent (1)

  • 11–20 per cent (2)

  • 21–30 per cent (3)

  • 31–40 per cent (4)

  • 41–50 per cent (5)

  • More than 50 per cent (6) Q46 We should use non-Western sources when teaching Comparative Politics courses.

  • Strongly agree (1)

  • Agree (2)

  • Neither agree nor disagree (3)

  • Disagree (4)

  • Strongly disagree (5) Q47 It has been suggested by the Association of American Colleges and Universities (AAC & U), American Council on Education (ACE), and NAFSA: Association of International Educators, and others that because the world is becoming more connected through globalisation, cross-cultural exchange, and changes in the global balance of power, students need to be more aware of the world around them. In your opinion, how does internationalising the curriculum fit within this trend?

  • Open response Q48 In your mind, what would be the priority of an internationalisation process on your campus? Check all that apply.

  • New courses (1)

  • Inclusion of international media and perspectives in existing courses (2)

  • Increased number of international students (3)

  • Increased number of international faculty (4)

  • Increased number of semester or year-long study abroad for students (5)

  • Increased number of short-term study abroad opportunities for students (6)

  • Other (please specify) (7) ____________________ Q49 On a scale of 1-10, with 1 being not satisfied at all and 10 being fully satisfied, how satisfied are you with the policies and practices of internationalisation in your department?

  • 0 (0)

  • 1 (1)

  • 2 (2)

  • 3 (3)

  • 4 (4)

  • 5 (5)

  • 6 (6)

  • 7 (7)

  • 8 (8)

  • 9 (9)

  • 10 (10)Q51 Why?

  • Open response Q50 In your University?

  • 0 (0)

  • 1 (1)

  • 2 (2)

  • 3 (3)

  • 4 (4)

  • 5 (5)

  • 6 (6)

  • 7 (7)

  • 8 (8)

  • 9 (9)

  • 10 (10) Q52 Why?

  • Open response Q53 Internationalising the curriculum is important to the discipline of political science.

  • Strongly agree (1)

  • Agree (2)

  • Neither agree nor disagree (3)

  • Disagree (4)

  • Strongly disagree (5) Q54 Internationalising the curriculum is important to national security.

  • Strongly agree (1)

  • Agree (2)

  • Neither agree nor disagree (3)

  • Disagree (4)

  • Strongly disagree (5) Q55 Internationalising the curriculum is important to the United States’ long-term economic success.

  • Strongly agree (1)

  • Agree (2)

  • Neither agree nor disagree (3)

  • Disagree (4)

  • Strongly disagree (5) Q56 Internationalising the curriculum is important to our students.

  • Strongly agree (1)

  • Agree (2)

  • Neither agree nor disagree (3)

  • Disagree (4)

  • Strongly disagree (5) Q57 Internationalising the curriculum is important for developing critical thinking skills in our students.

  • Strongly agree (1)

  • Agree (2)

  • Neither agree nor disagree (3)

  • Disagree (4)

  • Strongly disagree (5) Q58 Internationalising the curriculum is important for developing writing skills in our students.

  • Strongly agree (1)

  • Agree (2)

  • Neither agree nor disagree (3)

  • Disagree (4)

  • Strongly disagree (5) Q59 Internationalising the curriculum is important for our students’ future employment prospects.

  • Strongly agree (1)

  • Agree (2)

  • Neither agree nor disagree (3)

  • Disagree (4)

  • Strongly disagree (5) Q60 Internationalising the political science curriculum makes the discipline more attractive to potential majors and minors.

  • Strongly agree (1)

  • Agree (2)

  • Neither agree nor disagree (3)

  • Disagree (4)

  • Strongly disagree (5) Q61 What role does study abroad play in internationalising the curriculum?

  • Open response Q62 How does internationalising the curriculum fit within the larger globalisation movement?

  • Open response Q63 What are barriers to internationalisation on your campus?

  • Open response Q64 Has the University’s internationalisation effort had any negative impact on your department?

  • Yes (1)

  • No (2) ANSWER IF Q64 Has the University’s internationalisation effort had any … Yes is Selected Q65 Why?

  • Open response Q66 What is your current professional status:

  • Graduate Student (1)

  • Adjunct Instructor (2)

  • Lecturer (3)

  • Assistant Professor (4)

  • Associate Professor (5)

  • Professor (6) Q67 Are you tenured?

  • Yes (1)

  • No (2) ANSWER IF Q67 Are you tenured? No is Selected Q68 Are you tenure-track?

  • Yes (1)

  • No (2) Q69 Are you a US citizen?

  • Yes (1)

  • No (2) ANSWER IF Q69 Are you a US citizen? No is Selected Q70 What citizenship do you have?

  • Open response Q71 Do you identify as:

  • Male (1)

  • Female (2)

  • Transgendered (3)

  • Prefer not to answer (4) Q72 How old are you?

  • Under 30 (1)

  • 30–35 (2)

  • 36–40 (3)

  • 41–45 (4)

  • 46–50 (5)

  • 51–55 (6)

  • 56–60 (7)

  • 61–65 (8)

  • Over 65 (9)

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roberts, j. internationalising the curriculum: assessing faculty, departments, and schools on their efforts. Eur Polit Sci 15, 23–36 (2016). https://doi.org/10.1057/eps.2015.40

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Keywords

  • internationalizing education
  • global approach
  • curricular/program development
  • curricular/program assessment
  • pilot survey